February 3, 2014   795 notes

nprmusic:

When he first played it for Bobby Womack, who was his protégé, he said, ‘What’s it sound like?’ And Bobby said, ‘It sounds like death.’

— Hear the story behind Sam Cooke’s “A Change is Gonna Come,” which turns 50 this year 

January 31, 2014   453 notes

“ We are bound to others, past and present, and by each crime and every kindness, we birth our future. ”

David Mitchell (via greatauthorquotes)

January 22, 2014   16 notes
September 5, 2013

September Book Club

We’re going to talk about Gregor the Overlander (by Suzanne Collins) this month. This book was chosen because it is a little-known book at our school, but it’s written by a well-known author. We’ll meet during lunch on the 25th.

image

September 5, 2013   28 notes

kissiepie175:

So everybody’s heard of the Hunger Games, right? Well here’s another amazing, super awesome, fantastic book series by the lovely, Suzanne Collins. You can actually consider this book series one of the first I fell in love with! PJO/HOO and HG fans, I TOTALLY recommend this series to you guys.

The book covers above are the new ones and the ones below are the old ones. I really do like what they recently did, but..the old covers just bring back memories—to me anyway ;) 

Description of book 1, Gregor the Overlander

"When eleven-year-old Gregor follows his little sister through a grate in the laundry room of their New York apartment, he hurtles into the dark Underland beneath the city. There, humans live uneasily beside giant spiders, bats, cockroaches, and rats, but the fragile peace is about to fall apart.

Gregor wants no part of a conflict between these creepy creatures. He just wants to find his way home. But when he discovers that a strange prophecy foretells a role for him in the Underland’s uncertain future, he realizes it might be the only way to solve the biggest mystery of his life. Little does he know his quest will change him and the Underland forever.

Rich in suspense and brimming with adventure, Suzanne Collin’s debut marked a thrilling new talent, and introduced a character no young reader will ever forget.”

A link to Suzanne Collin’s website — http://www.suzannecollinsbooks.com/gregor_the_overlander_48384.htm

Article about the new book covers — http://www.kernelscorner.com/2013/03/the-underland-chronicles-by-suzanne.html#.Uhvihvm1FSQ

(sorry I didn’t do a book recommendation last week! High school is already getting to me -_- )

July 20, 2013   375 notes
coolchicksfromhistory:

Tamar of Georgia (circa 1160-1213)
Art by Jacquie Jeanes (tumblr, website)
Tamar (თამარი) was the first woman to rule the nation of Georgia.  She was proclaimed heir apparent and co-ruler by her father George III in 1178. Despite significant opposition from the aristocracy, Tamar was crowned king* after her father’s death in 1184.   
The decline of the neighboring Seljuqids created a power vacuum in the region and Tamar built on the successes of her predecessors to expand the Georgian Empire.  At its zenith, the Georgian Empire including large parts of present-day Azerbaijan, Armenia, and eastern Turkey.  With this prosperity, Georgia entered a cultural golden age.  Tbilisi, Georgia’s capitol, became a center of trade with a diverse mix of Caucasian, Byzantine  Persian, and Arabic cultures.  Romantic poetry thrived and it was during this period that Shota Rustaveli composed Georgia’s national poem “The Knight in the Panther’s Skin.”  Tamar was a devout Christian and eventually canonized by the Orthodox Church.  During her reign, a number of cathedrals were built in the region.    
Tamar married twice.  Her first husband, Prince Yuri of Novgorod, was chosen by the Georgian court and the marriage ended in divorce.  After the divorce, Yuri attempted a coup but was quickly defeated.  Tamar chose her second husband, Prince David Soslan of Alania.  David was an excellent military commander and he became one of Tamar’s closest advisors.  Together they had two children, George and Rusudan, both of whom eventually ruled Georgia.
Like her father, Tamar named her oldest child co-ruler while he was still a teenager.  George IV ruled for only ten years after Tamar’s death.  The Mongols were on the move and they attacked Georgia in the 1220s, leaving George IV severely wounded.  Tamar’s daughter Rusudan took the throne after George IV’s death in 1223, but she lacked her mother’s skill and good fortune.  Georgia fell, first to the Khwarezmians, then to the Mongols.  Several of Tamar’s descendants attempted to hold Georgia together but for the bulk of the next 700 years, Georgia existed as a province or vassal state of some larger empire: Mongol, Persian, Ottoman, Russian, or Soviet. 
*A number of queen regents were crowned king to signify that they were rulers rather than consorts.  Other examples include Hatsheput of Egypt and Maria Teresa of Austro-Hungary. 

coolchicksfromhistory:

Tamar of Georgia (circa 1160-1213)

Art by Jacquie Jeanes (tumblr, website)

Tamar (თამარი) was the first woman to rule the nation of Georgia.  She was proclaimed heir apparent and co-ruler by her father George III in 1178. Despite significant opposition from the aristocracy, Tamar was crowned king* after her father’s death in 1184.   

The decline of the neighboring Seljuqids created a power vacuum in the region and Tamar built on the successes of her predecessors to expand the Georgian Empire.  At its zenith, the Georgian Empire including large parts of present-day Azerbaijan, Armenia, and eastern Turkey.  With this prosperity, Georgia entered a cultural golden age.  Tbilisi, Georgia’s capitol, became a center of trade with a diverse mix of Caucasian, Byzantine  Persian, and Arabic cultures.  Romantic poetry thrived and it was during this period that Shota Rustaveli composed Georgia’s national poem The Knight in the Panther’s Skin.”  Tamar was a devout Christian and eventually canonized by the Orthodox Church.  During her reign, a number of cathedrals were built in the region.    

Tamar married twice.  Her first husband, Prince Yuri of Novgorod, was chosen by the Georgian court and the marriage ended in divorce.  After the divorce, Yuri attempted a coup but was quickly defeated.  Tamar chose her second husband, Prince David Soslan of Alania.  David was an excellent military commander and he became one of Tamar’s closest advisors.  Together they had two children, George and Rusudan, both of whom eventually ruled Georgia.

Like her father, Tamar named her oldest child co-ruler while he was still a teenager.  George IV ruled for only ten years after Tamar’s death.  The Mongols were on the move and they attacked Georgia in the 1220s, leaving George IV severely wounded.  Tamar’s daughter Rusudan took the throne after George IV’s death in 1223, but she lacked her mother’s skill and good fortune.  Georgia fell, first to the Khwarezmians, then to the Mongols.  Several of Tamar’s descendants attempted to hold Georgia together but for the bulk of the next 700 years, Georgia existed as a province or vassal state of some larger empire: Mongol, Persian, Ottoman, Russian, or Soviet. 

*A number of queen regents were crowned king to signify that they were rulers rather than consorts.  Other examples include Hatsheput of Egypt and Maria Teresa of Austro-Hungary.